News

New in 2022!

  • We’re recruiting for multiple postdoc positions! Click here for more information!
  • Congratulations to postdoc Dr. Xinjun Zhang who will be starting as a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Genetics at the University of Michigan!
  • Our work using genomic-informed simulations to forecast the fate of the vaquita was published in Science! Special congrats to co-first authors Chris Kyriazis and Jacqueline Robinson. This work was featured in UCLA Newsroom, The Washington Post, National Geographic . Also, check out Chris’s appearance on the Quirks and Quarks podcast discussing this work.
  • Congratulations to postdoc Dr. Izabel Cavassim who started a new position as a Bioinformatics Research Scientist at Illumina.
  • Congratulations to EEB Graduate Student Tina Del Carpio for winning the Life Science Excellence Award in Promoting Diversity & Inclusion! Way to go Tina!

2021

  • Garcia & Lohmueller: Our paper on how negative selection can impact patterns of linkage disequilibrium between non synonymous variants has been published in PLoS Genetics. Congratulations to Jesse on his first lead-author publication!
  • Congratulations to postdoc Dr. Xinjun Zhang for receiving a NIH K99/R00 Pathway to Independence grant from NIGMS!
  • Congratulations to former PhD student Jazlyn Mooney for accepting a faculty position at USC! Also, check out Jazlyn’s new paper in PNAS about runs of homozygosity, identity by descent, and inbreeding depression in dogs. Jazlyn’s paper has received some media coverage!
  • Durvasula & Lohmueller: Our paper on how negative selection and demographic history can decrease the performance of genetic risk predictions in diverse populations has been published in AJHG! Congratulations to Arun for successfully completing his PhD and moving on to a postdoc position at Harvard!
  • Former postdocs Eduardo Amorim and Christian Huber started faculty positions at CalState Northridge and Penn State! Congratulations!

2020

  • Kyriazis et al: Our paper on how strongly deleterious recessive mutations can modulate extinction risk of small populations is now published in Evolution Letters.